Audubon Field Trip to Elk Country – Oct 1

Join Audubon for Field Trip to Elk Country

Jamestown, NY – As part of its Bucket List Series, the Audubon Center & Sanctuary is offering a rare opportunity: a field trip to see elk in the wild.

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As part of its Bucket List Series, on Wednesday, October 1, the Audubon Center & Sanctuary is taking a field trip to the beautiful Elk Country Visitor Center in Benezette, Pennsylvania, where participants will learn about as well as see and hear elk. (Photo by Jennifer Schlick)

Elk once roamed much of North America but began to disappear from the East in the 1800s due to overhunting and habitat destruction. Reintroduction programs beginning in the early twentieth century brought wild stock from western populations back east. One strong population can be found in Benezette, Pa., about 80 miles southeast of the Audubon Center.

At 10 a.m. on Wednesday, October 1, the Audubon van will depart for Benezette to visit the beautiful Elk Country Visitor Center. The afternoon will be spent learning about these majestic animals through displays and diorama, interactive touch screen exhibits, the touch and feel Discovery Room, and the 4D story theater.

The Elk Country Visitor Center’s 245 acre property is prime habitat for elk and other wildlife, with crops planted that elk prefer, to attract them and increase viewing opportunities. Three trails are available for an easy and enjoyable walk leading to observation areas next to the fields.

After dinner at the Benezette Hotel, the group will view the elk at dusk, when they are most active.

By September, males have regrown antlers and are attracting females with a bugling call. It is possible to observe skirmishes between males for territory and mates at this time of year as well.

Participants should dress for comfort in the van and for the weather. Bring binoculars, cameras, snacks/lunch, water, and money for dinner.

For more information about the Elk Country Visitor Center visit http://www.ExperienceElkCountry.com.

The trip is limited to nine people in the van, then others can carpool. Return will be approximately 10:30 p.m.

Cost is $30 or $20 for Friends of the Nature Center. Reservations with payment are required by Friday, September 26, 2014: call (716) 569-2345 or use the on-line form by clicking through “Bucket List: Elk Field Trip” at http://www.jamestownaudubon.org.

For more information on this and other Audubon opportunities, call (716) 569-2345 or visit http://www.jamestownaudubon.org.

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Posted in Field Trip, News Release

Leaf Printing Workshop at Audubon

Jamestown, NY – The Audubon Center & Sanctuary has the perfect opportunity for you to get your creative juices going and make some beautiful items to keep for yourself or give as gifts.

From 1:00 to 3:30 p.m. on Saturday afternoon, September 27, 2014, Audubon is presenting a Leaf Printing Workshop where participants will make two leaf monoprints, one on paper and one on a scarf.

The Audubon Center & Sanctuary is offering a Leaf Printing Workshop on Saturday afternoon, September 27. Participants will use leaves collected in Audubon’s Ted Grisez Arboretum to make two monoprints: a wall hanging on paper and a scarf of beautiful bamboo fabric.

The Audubon Center & Sanctuary is offering a Leaf Printing Workshop on Saturday afternoon, September 27. Participants will use leaves collected in Audubon’s Ted Grisez Arboretum to make two monoprints: a wall hanging on paper and a scarf of beautiful bamboo fabric.

After a brief demonstration by retired fine arts teacher Sue Yauchzy of what is meant by “leaf monoprint,” the class will head outside with naturalist Jennifer Schlick to Audubon’s Ted Grisez Arboretum, a living museum containing over 60 native trees. You will learn a bit about the Audubon grounds and the trees in this gigantic garden while you collect a few fallen leaves for your project.

Back inside, Yauchzy takes over again to lead you through the process of making two projects – one on paper, and one on a scarf made from bamboo fabric that drapes beautifully.

Participants are reminded to dress for the weather for the brief walk outside and to keep in mind that they will be using permanent inks. You are welcome to bring leaves from a favorite tree to incorporate into your art project.

Class size is limited. The fee of $35 or $30 for Friends of the Nature Center includes all materials as well as a copy of Audubon’s Arboretum guide.

Reservations with payment are required by Friday, September 19, 2014: call (716) 569-2345 or use the on-line form by clicking through “Leaf Printing on Scarves” at http://jamestownaudubon.org.

Audubon education programs are funded with support from the Carnahan Jackson Foundation, Jessie Smith Darrah Fund, Holmberg Foundation, Hultquist Foundation, Johnson Foundation, and Lenna Foundation.

The Audubon Center & Sanctuary is at 1600 Riverside Road, one-quarter mile east of Route 62 between Jamestown, New York, and Warren, Pennsylvania.

To learn more about Audubon and its many programs, call (716) 569-2345 or visit http://www.jamestownaudubon.org.

Posted in Uncategorized

Audubon Enchanted Forest Reservations Open to Public

Jamestown, NY – A Black Bear, a Skunk, a Flying Squirrel, Mice, a Pileated Woodpecker and a Star Nosed Mole.

All these human-sized animals will tell visitors about their habits, their homes, and more at the Audubon Center & Sanctuary’s Enchanted Forest on Friday and Saturday, October 3 and 4.

Skunk

This skunk is one of the human-sized animals that will share their life stories along the luminary-lit trail at the Audubon Center & Sanctuary’s Enchanted Forest. Reservations can now be made by the public for tours on either Friday or Saturday, October 3 or 4. Reservation deadline is Friday, September 26.

Registration is now open to the general public. Initial enrollment for this popular event was reserved for members of Jamestown Audubon’s Friends of the Nature Center.

Now in its ninth year, the Enchanted Forest introduces amazing animal characters that share fascinating and fun information through dramatic and entertaining stories, delighting children as well as the adults fortunate enough to accompany them.

After stories and songs at a backyard campfire, guides called “fireflies” lead visitors on a trail lined with luminaries. Along the way are animals that talk about their habits, homes, and more. After about a 45-minute walk, participants enjoy refreshments and crafts inside the Nature Center.

As a nature-themed alternative or addition to the traditional Halloween celebration, everyone is encouraged to wear Halloween costumes for this evening that is best described as “magical.”

Admission is $12, $8 for Friends of the Nature Center, $6 for children 3-15, and free for children two and under.

Pre-registration with payment is required to reserve a specific time slot from 6 p.m. through 8 p.m. Tours begin every 10 minutes. Deadline for registration is Friday, September 26; there will be no ticket sales at the door.

To register, call (716) 569-2345 or print and mail the online registration form at http://www.audubonenchantedforest.wordpress.com. Tickets will be mailed upon receipt of payment by cash, check or Visa/MasterCard/Discover.

Participants are reminded to dress for the weather. Long pants, long sleeve shirts, close-toed shoes and insect repellent are recommended. These precautions will help protect from biting insects such as mosquitos. The program takes place rain or shine, and there are no refunds.

Enchanted Forest sponsors Carroll Rod and Gun Club, Kings’ Heating and Sheet Metal, Inc. and Zahm and Matsons Ag and Turf.

Enchanted Forest is made possible through the dedication of many volunteers, some of whom are registered with RSVP, the Retired Senior Volunteer Program.

The Audubon Center & Sanctuary is at 1600 Riverside Road, one-quarter mile east of Route 62 between Jamestown, New York, and Warren, Pennsylvania.

To learn more about Audubon and its many programs, call (716) 569-2345 or visit http://www.jamestownaudubon.org.

Posted in Uncategorized

Making Memories

Making Memories
by Katie Finch

This summer I had the good fortune to go on vacation with 16 members of my family.  Some may think this a week to be tolerated.  For me, this was a trip to anticipate with pleasure and enjoy. With all chipping in, we went rented a big house at the beach.  In a large house with all the amenities, a short walk to the beach and the only scheduled activity being dinner at 6:30pm, we had the freedom and ability to do what we wanted to do.  Some read, some fished; others sunbathed and went for walks.

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Making Memories: Catching Ghost Crabs

There was plenty to do during the day.  But what does a large group, ranging in age from 14 months to 65 years old do in the evening?   After the sun went down, we took buckets and flashlights and headed back to the beach.  And it was there that the chase started.

We designated “seekers”, “catchers” and “cameras”.  Our quarry? The small, but quick Ghost Crab.  After the sun goes down, these nocturnal crustaceans leave the safety of their sand tunnels to feed at the water line.  No bigger than 2 inches, the beach is full of scurrying little creatures with sizable front claws.

When a “seeker” spotted a crab, they followed it with the beam of the flashlight so the “catcher” could grab it before it ducked down a hole.  When a crab was caught, the rest of the group would gather around to look and dare each other to touch before we returned our temporary captive, a little shaken but unharmed, to the sand.

While catching crabs may at first seem like a frivolous activity, I ask you to look closer.  For three nights in a row we laughed- a lot- together.  Watching my cousin and uncle, feet wide, knees bend and hands out looked like a poor execution of a basketball drill.  Some overcame fears of the creepy crawly and the dark. We encouraged one another in our joint quest, celebrated in our successes and supported each other in our failures.

The natural world so often provides the setting for a shared experience that provides so much more than just intellectual knowledge about the nature topic at hand. While we did learn about crabs, we learned a little more about one another and created memories as we marveled at the wonders of our world.

And what was just as special about those nights on the beach? At the same time we were chasing, laughing and sometimes screaming, other groups, who could only be spotted by their roaming flashlights, were doing the same thing.

In a house with a TV in every room, it would have been easy to retreat to our respective rooms, each watching what we wanted.  In a society where our options for how we spend our free time are so varied and so vast, we would do well to remember the outdoors as a choice.  As we seek to grow and develop relationships with people in our lives, look to the natural world as a setting for that to happen.  It can be as simple as going for a hike, watching the stars or catching crabs.  Not only do your relationships with friends and family grow but so does your relationship with the natural world.  And that is never wasted time.

Preschool Enchanted Forest

Meet a talking Owl at Enchanted Forest!

Audubon is hosting an event this fall that allows both kids and adults to make memories together in the outdoors.  Join us on either Friday or Saturday, October 3 or 4 for Enchanted Forest.  This is a non-scary Halloween event where you are led down a luminary lit trail at night to talking animals.  These costumed animal actors share some of the interesting facts about their animal life.

The animals featured this year include a Black Bear, Striped Skunk, Mice, Star Nosed Mole and Pileated Woodpecker.

To take part in the event you must have prepaid reservations.  There are still openings for slots. Tours begin every 10 minutes between 6:00pm and 8:00pm. Deadline for registration is Friday, September 26; there will be no ticket sales at the door.  To register, call (716) 569-2345 or stop by the nature center. The event takes place rain or shine.

Enchanted Forest inside in 2013

Guests are encouraged to come in costume!

This event is made possible by numerous volunteers assisting in both the planning and the day of the event.  Bill Colter and Bob Ungerer  and Amanda Melquist  are once again organizing the event.   Thank you also to our sponsors: Carroll Rod and Gun Club, King’s Heating and Z&M Ag and Turf.  I am pleased to work for an organization that has such support from the members and businesses in the community.

Jamestown Audubon is located at 1600 Riverside Road in the town of Kiantone, one-quarter mile east of Route 62 between Jamestown, New York and Warren, Pennsylvania. Learn more about the Center & Sanctuary and the many programs and events by visiting http://jamestownaudubon.org.

Katie Finch is a naturalist at Jamestown Audubon.

Posted in Article, Event, Katie Finch

Members Can Reserve Now for Enchanted Forest – Non-members starting Sept 12

First Call for Audubon Enchanted Forest Reservations

Jamestown, NY – You don’t have to be a child to be charmed by human-sized animals that talk to you and tell you about their lives.

Enchanted Forest Little Brown Bat

At the Audubon Center and Sanctuary’s Enchanted Forest, you can meet animals like this Little Brown Bat along the trail and listen as it shares its life history. Friends of the Nature Center can make reservations for the Friday and Saturday, October 3 and 4, event now; non-members can reserve beginning Friday, September 12. Deadline for registration is Friday, September 26.

“Magical” is the best description for the Audubon Center & Sanctuary’s annual Enchanted Forest. Friday and Saturday evenings, October 3 and 4, 2014, will be the ninth presentation of this event that continues to delight children and the adults – parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, friends – fortunate enough to accompany them.

The evening begins with stories and songs at a backyard campfire. Then as you follow the trail lined with luminaries, you meet animals who tell you about their habits, homes, and more. After about a 45-minute walk, you can enjoy refreshments and crafts inside the building.

As a nature-themed alternative or addition to the traditional Halloween celebration, everyone is encouraged to wear Halloween costumes. The Enchanted Forest introduces amazing animal characters that share fascinating and fun information through dramatic and entertaining stories.

Both children and adults will be entertained and enlightened by this year’s animals: a Black Bear, Skunk, Flying Squirrel, Mice, Pileated Woodpecker and Star Nosed Mole.

Fee is $12, $8 for Friends of the Nature Center, $6 for children 3-15, and free for children two and under.

Friends of the Nature Center can make reservations now; non-members can reserve beginning Friday, September 12.

Pre-registration with payment is required to reserve a specific time slot from 6 p.m. through 8 p.m. Tours begin every 10 minutes. Deadline for registration is Friday, September 26; there will be no ticket sales at the door.

To register, call (716) 569-2345 or print and mail the online registration form at http://www.audubonenchantedforest.wordpress.com. Tickets will be mailed upon receipt of payment by cash, check or Visa/MasterCard/Discover.

Participants are reminded to dress for the weather. Long pants, long sleeve shirts, close-toed shoes and insect repellent are recommended. These precautions will help protect from biting insects such as mosquitos. The program takes place rain or shine, and there are no refunds.

Sponsors to date are Carroll Rod and Gun Club, Kings’ Heating and Sheet Metal, Inc. and Zahm and Matsons Ag and Turf. Sponsorship information is also available at http://www.audubonenchantedforest.wordpress.com.

Enchanted Forest is made possible through the dedication of many volunteers, some of whom are registered with RSVP, the Retired Senior Volunteer Program.

The Audubon Center & Sanctuary is at 1600 Riverside Road, one-quarter mile east of Route 62 between Jamestown, New York, and Warren, Pennsylvania.

To learn more about Audubon and its many programs, call (716) 569-2345 or visit http://www.jamestownaudubon.org.

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Posted in Uncategorized

Pre-Inventory Sale at Audubon’s Blue Heron Gift Shop!!

Audubon Gift Shop Sale September 13 & 14

Jamestown, NY – “With the approach of inventory time for our Blue Heron Gift Shop, we decided to give both ourselves and our supporters a break by having a sale.”

Gift Shop

On Saturday and Sunday, September 13 and 14, the Audubon Center & Sanctuary’s Blue Heron Gift Shop will be holding a special pre-inventory sale, with discounts of 20%, or 30% for Friends of the Nature Center. Featured sale items will be locally produced edibles as well as selected t-shirts and polo shirts.

That’s how Jamestown Audubon President Ruth Lundin announced that all the edibles in the recently renovated and expanded nature store at the Audubon Center & Sanctuary will be discounted on the weekend of Saturday and Sunday, September 13 and 14. Saturday hours are 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and Sunday hours are 1-4:30 p.m.

“We have a great selection of locally produced edibles that we’re going to offer at 20% off – or 30% to Friends of the Nature Center,” Lundin said. She noted that these make great gifts and include jams and jellies, honey, Stedman Corners bird-friendly coffee, pancake mix, and maple syrup and related products, like raspberry maple spread and sweet maple mustard.

Selected t-shirts and polo shirts will also be on sale.

All these will be available as long as the supplies last.

Other items that may be of interest at their regular prices are puppets, puzzles, jewelry, notecards and stationery, handcrafted walking sticks, nature related books and field guides, t-shirts, embroidered polo shirts and fleece jackets, bird feeders and bird seed, and more.

The Blue Heron also carries jewelry made by Women of the Cloud Forest artists who create different types of earrings, bracelets and necklaces using rainforest seeds. This Fair Trade project supplies a never ending range of colors, styles and patterns of beautiful jewelry to many of the leading, zoos, botanical gardens, museums and boutique shops across the country.

There is never an admission fee to visit the Blue Heron Gift Shop. Sundays are free admission days for the Nature Center, where visitors can enjoy displays of local reptiles and amphibians, plus tanks of fish. Other indoor exhibits include Frogs, Energy and Pollination. There is also seating to observe a beautiful view of birds, chipmunks, squirrels and sometimes even deer at the Center’s birdfeeders.

Blue Heron Gift Shop sales support Audubon’s wide-ranging environmental education programs, physical facilities, education animals – including Liberty, the non-releasable Bald Eagle – and 600-acre wetland preserve.

The Audubon Center & Sanctuary is at 1600 Riverside Road, one-quarter mile east of Route 62 between Jamestown, New York, and Warren, Pennsylvania. The building is open 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday-Saturday and 1-4:30 p.m. Sundays. The grounds, including trails, gardens, picnic tables, arboretum, and Liberty, are open from dawn until dusk daily.

For more information, call (716) 569-2345 or visit http://www.jamestownaudubon.org.

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Posted in Uncategorized

Learn to Make Rope at Audubon

Learn to Make Rope from Natural Fiber at Audubon

Jamestown, NY – How would you like to learn to make rope from an abundant plant found in nature?

Dogbane Patch

You can learn to make rope from Dogbane, this abundant plant that is also called Indian Hemp. Master Naturalist Chris Collins will lead the Audubon Center & Sanctuary’s Natural Fiber Cordage Workshop on Saturday afternoon, September 20. (Photo by Jennifer Schlick)

On Saturday afternoon, September 20, Master Naturalist and living historian Chris Collins will teach you to make natural fiber cordage using native plants at the Audubon Center & Sanctuary’s Natural Fiber Cordage Workshop.

Using simple but time-honored techniques, from 1-2:30 p.m. Collins will demonstrate using Dogbane (Apocynum cannabinum L.), also called Indian Hemp. He will walk participants through the steps to identify the plant in the field, learn to extract the fibers from the stalk, and use those fibers to create cordage. Each participant will make approximately two feet of natural cordage.

The use of natural resources for utilitarian purposes is not a new concept. Indigenous people have been using such materials for a very long time. There are still people who are dedicated in keeping this art form and knowledge alive in this present time era. So whether you are looking to learn a new skill or are just interested in history and nature, you are invited to come and join the fun!

Chris Collins is a Master Naturalist through Cornell Cooperative Extension. The Master Naturalist Program is a high-quality, science-based training program designed to teach adults about New York’s natural resources, empowering them to educate others and participate in on-the-ground conservation management projects. Collins has a strong personal interest in living history and native material culture.

This workshop has both an inside and outside component, with a short walk of about a half mile. Participants are reminded to dress for the weather and asked to bring a small, sharp non-serrated pocket knife.

Fee is $12 or $9 for Friends of the Nature Center.
Class size is limited. Paid reservations are required by Tuesday, September 16: call (716) 569-2345 or use the online form by clicking through “Cordage Workshop” at http://www.jamestownaudubon.org.

Audubon education programs are funded with support from the Carnahan Jackson Foundation, Jessie Smith Darrah Fund, Holmberg Foundation, Hultquist Foundation, Johnson Foundation, and the Lenna Foundation.

The Audubon Center & Sanctuary is at 1600 Riverside Road, one-quarter mile east of Route 62 between Jamestown, New York, and Warren, Pennsylvania.

To learn more about Audubon and its many programs, call (716) 569-2345 or visit http://www.jamestownaudubon.org.

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Posted in Uncategorized